fixed


manipulator function
<ios>
ios_base& fixed ( ios_base& str );

Use fixed-point notation

Sets the floatfield format flag for the str stream to fixed.

When floatfield is set to fixed, float values are written using fixed-point notation, which means the value is represented with exactly as many digits in the fraction part as specified by the precision field and with no exponent part.

The floatfield format flag is both a selective and a toggle flag, so it can take any of its two possible following values (using the manipulators fixed and scientific), or none of them (using ios_base::unsetf):
flag valueeffect when set
fixedwrite floating point values in fixed-point notation.
scientificwrite floating-point values in scientific notation.
(none)write floating-point values in default floating-point notation.


The floatfield flag is not set in standard streams on initialization.

The precision field can be modified using the ios_base::precision member of the stream.

Notice that the treatment of the precision field differs between the default floating-point notation and the fixed and scientific notations. On the default floating-point notation, the precision field specifies the maximum number of meaningful digits to display both before and after the decimal point, while in both the fixed and scientific notations, the precision filed specifies exactly how many digits to display after the decimal point, even if they are trailing decimal zeros.

Parameters

str
Stream object where to apply.
Because this function is a manipulator, it is designed to be used alone with no arguments in conjunction with the insertion (<<) and extraction (>>) operations on streams (see example below).


Return Value

A reference to the stream object.

Example

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// modify basefield
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  double a,b,c;
  a = 3.1415926534;
  b = 2006.0;
  c = 1.0e-10;
  cout.precision(5);
  cout       <<         a << '\t' << b << '\t' << c << endl;
  cout <<   fixed    << a << '\t' << b << '\t' << c << endl;
  cout << scientific << a << '\t' << b << '\t' << c << endl;
  return 0;
}


The execution of this example displays something similar to:
3.1416          2006            1e-010
3.14159         2006.00000      0.00000
3.14159e+000    2.00600e+003    1.00000e-010


See also